Information Modeling and Relational Databases

Information Modeling and Relational Databases

by: Terry Halpin, Tony Morgan

Elsevier Trade Monographs, 2008

ISBN: 9780080568737 , 976 Pages

2. Edition

Format: PDF, ePUB, Read online

Windows PC,Mac OSX suitable for all DRM-capable eReaders Apple iPad, Android Tablet PC's Palm OS, PocketPC 2002 und älter, PocketPC 2003 und neuer, Windows Mobile Smartphone, Handys (mit Symbian) Read Online: Windows PC,Mac OSX,Linux

Price: 78,48 EUR

More eBook Details

Information Modeling and Relational Databases


 

Front Cover

1

Information Modeling and Relational Databases

4

Copyright Page

5

Contents

8

Foreword by John Zachman

14

Foreword by Sjir Nijssen

18

Foreword by Gordon Everest

20

Preface

22

Chapter 1 Introduction

28

1.1 Information Modeling

29

1.2 Modeling Approaches

33

1.3 Some Historical Background

46

1.4 The Relevant Skills

50

1.5 Summary

51

Chapter 2 Information Levels and Frameworks

54

2.1 Four Information Levels

55

2.2 The Conceptual Level

59

2.3 Database Design Example

70

2.4 Development Frameworks

75

2.5 Summary

82

Chapter 3 Conceptual Modeling: First Steps

86

3.1 Conceptual Modeling Language Criteria

87

3.2 Conceptual Schema Design Procedure

89

3.3 CSDP Step 1: From Examples to Elementary Facts

90

3.4 CSDP Step 2: Draw Fact Types and Populate

108

3.5 CSDP Step 3: Trim Schema; Note Basic Derivations

122

3.6 Summary

131

Chapter 4 Uniqueness Constraints

136

4.1 Introduction to CSDP Step 4

137

4.2 Uniqueness Constraints on Unaries and Binaries

138

4.3 Uniqueness Constraints on Longer Fact Types

149

4.4 External Uniqueness Constraints

155

4.5 Key Length Check

164

4.6 Projections and Joins

177

4.7 Summary

182

Chapter 5 Mandatory Roles

186

5.1 Introduction to CSDP Step 5

187

5.2 Mandatory and Optional Roles

189

5.3 Reference Schemes

201

5.4 Case Study: A Compact Disc Retailer

220

5.5 Logical Derivation Check

227

5.6 Summary

234

Chapter 6 Value, Set-Comparison, and Subtype Constraints

238

6.1 Introduction to CSDP Step 6

239

6.2 Basic Set Theory

239

6.3 Value Constraints and Independent Types

243

6.4 Subset, Equality, and Exclusion Constraints

251

6.5 Subtyping

265

6.6 Generalization of Object Types

287

6.7 Summary

295

Chapter 7 Other Constraints and Final Checks

298

7.1 Introduction to CSDP Step 7

299

7.2 Occurrence Frequencies

299

7.3 Ring Constraints

304

7.4 Other Constraints and Rules

316

7.5 Final Checks

322

7.6 Summary

330

Chapter 8 Entity Relationship Modeling

332

8.1 Overview of ER

333

8.2 Barker notation

335

8.3 Information Engineering notation

345

8.4 IDEF1X

349

8.5 Mapping from ORM to ER

361

8.6 Summary

369

Chapter 9 Data Modeling in UML

372

9.1 Introduction

373

9.2 Object-Orientation

375

9.3 Attributes

378

9.4 Associations

384

9.5 Set-Comparison Constraints

391

9.6 Subtyping

399

9.7 Other Constraints and Derivation Rules

403

9.8 Mapping from ORM to UML

415

9.9 Summary

422

Chapter 10 Advanced Modeling Issues

426

10.1 Join Constraints

427

10.2 Deontic Rules

435

10.3 Temporality

438

10.4 Collection Types

459

10.5 Nominalization and Objectification

466

10.6 Open/Closed World Semantics

477

10.7 Higher-Order Types

483

10.8 Summary

496

Chapter 11 Relational Mapping

500

11.1 Implementing a Conceptual Schema

501

11.2 Relational Schemas

502

11.3 Relational Mapping Procedure

510

11.4 Advanced Mapping Aspects

537

11.5 Summary

552

Chapter 12 Data Manipulation with Relational Languages

554

12.1 Relational Algebra

555

12.2 Relational Database Systems

581

12.3 SQL: Historical and Structural Overview

583

12.4 SQL: Identifiers and Data Types

585

12.5 SQL: Choosing Columns, Rows, and Order

589

12.6 SQL: Joins

597

12.7 SQL: In, Between, Like, and Null Operators

609

12.8 SQL: Union and Simple Subqueries

618

12.9 SQL: Scalar Operators and Bag Functions

629

12.10 SQL: Grouping

638

12.11 SQL: Correlated and Existential Subqueries

646

12.12 SQL: Recursive Queries

653

12.13 SQL: Updating Table Populations

656

12.14 Summary

658

Chapter 13 Using Other Database Objects

664

13.1 SQL: The Bigger Picture

665

13.2 SQL: Defining Tables

665

13.3 SQL: Views

673

13.4 SQL: Triggers

679

13.5 SQL: Routines

682

13.6 SQL: More Database Objects

685

13.7 Transactions and Concurrency

689

13.8 Security and Meta-Data

691

13.9 Exploiting XML

693

13.10 Summary

711

Chapter 14 Schema Transformations

714

14.1 Schema Equivalence and Optimization

715

14.2 Predicate Specialization and Generalization

719

14.3 Nesting, Coreferencing, and Flattening

729

14.4 Other Transformations

745

14.5 Conceptual Schema Optimization

749

14.6 Normalization

761

14.7 Denormalization and Low Level Optimization

780

14.8 Reengineering

786

14.9 Data Migration and Query Transformation

793

14.10 Summary

796

Chapter 15 Process and State Modeling

800

15.1 Introduction/Modeling Dynamic Behavior

801

15.2 Processes and Workflow

804

15.3 State Models

812

15.4 Foundations for Process Theory

822

15.5 Modeling Information Dynamics in UML

827

15.6 Business Process Standards Initiatives

839

15.7 Standard Process Patterns

846

15.8 Summary

859

Chapter 16 Other Modeling Aspects and Trends

862

16.1 Introduction

863

16.2 Data Warehousing and OLAP

863

16.3 Conceptual Query Languages

870

16.4 Schema Abstraction Mechanisms

879

16.5 Further Design Aspects

884

16.6 Ontologies and the Semantic Web

891

16.7 Postrelational Databases

898

16.8 Metamodeling

908

16.9 Summary

915

ORM glossary

920

A

920

B

920

C

920

D

921

E

921

F

921

G

921

I

921

M

921

N

921

O

922

P

922

R

922

S

922

T

922

U

922

V

922

ER glossary

930

UML glossary

934

Useful Web Sites

938

Bibliography

940

Index

952

Symbols and Numbers

952

A

952

B

953

C

953

D

956

E

957

F

958

G

958

H

959

I

959

J

960

K

960

L

960

M

960

N

961

O

961

P

963

Q

964

R

964

S

965

T

967

U

968

V

969

W

969

X

969

Y

969

Z

969

About the Authors

970