Querying XML - XQuery, XPath, and SQL/XML in context

Querying XML - XQuery, XPath, and SQL/XML in context

by: Jim Melton, Stephen Buxton

Elsevier Reference Monographs, 2006

ISBN: 9780080540160 , 845 Pages

Format: PDF, ePUB, Read online

Windows PC,Mac OSX suitable for all DRM-capable eReaders Apple iPad, Android Tablet PC's Palm OS, PocketPC 2002 und älter, PocketPC 2003 und neuer, Windows Mobile Smartphone, Handys (mit Symbian) Read Online: Windows PC,Mac OSX,Linux

Price: 65,39 EUR

More eBook Details

Querying XML - XQuery, XPath, and SQL/XML in context


 

Front Cover

1

Querying XML: XQuery, XPath, and SQL/XML in Context

4

Copyright Page

5

Content

8

Foreword

18

Preface

20

Part I: XML: Documents and Data

30

Chapter 1. XML

32

1.1 Introduction

32

1.2 Adding Markup to Data

32

1.3 XML-Based Markup Languages

43

1.4 XML Data

48

1.5 Some Other Ways to Represent Data

50

1.6 Chapter Summary

57

Chapter 2. Querying

60

2.1 Introduction

60

2.2 Querying Traditional Data

61

2.3 Querying Nontraditional Data

68

2.4 Chapter Summary

72

Chapter 3. Querying XML

74

3. I Introduction

74

3.2 Navigating an XML Document

75

3.3 What DoYou Know about Your Data?

90

3.4 Some Ways to Query XMLToday

92

3.5 Chapter Summary

93

Part II: Metadata and XML

94

Chapter 4. Metadata – An Overview

96

4.1 Introduction

96

4.2 Structural Metadata

98

4.3 Semantic Metadata

104

4.4 Catalog Metadata

107

4.5 Integration Metadata

111

4.6 Chapter Summary

113

Chapter 5. Structural Metadata

114

5.1 Introduction

114

5.2 DTDs

115

5.3 XML Schema

129

5.4 Other Schema Languages for XML

144

5.5 Deriving an Implied Schema from a DTD

148

5.6 Chapter Summary

149

Chapter 6. The XML Information Set (Infoset) and Beyond

152

6.1 Introduction

152

6.2 What Is the Infoset?

153

6.3 The Infoset Information Items and Their Properties

154

6.4 The Infoset vs.the Document

162

6.5 The XPath 1.0 Data Model

165

6.6 The Post-Schema-Validation Infoset (PSVI)

167

6.7 The Document Object Model (DOM) — An API

171

6.8 Introducing the XQuery Data Model

175

6.9 A Note Regarding Data Model Terminology

176

6.10 Chapter Summary and Further Reading

178

Part III: Managing and Storing XML for Querying

180

Chapter 7. Managing XML: Transforming and Connecting

182

7.1 Introduction

182

7.2 Transforming, Formatting, and Displaying XML

183

7.3 The Relationships between XML Documents

192

7.4 Relationship Constraints: Enforcing Consistency

214

7.5 Chapter Summary

220

Chapter 8. Storing: XML and Databases

222

8.1 Introduction

222

8.2 The Need for Persistence

223

8.3 SQL/XML's XMLType

235

8.4 Accessing Persistent XML Data

236

8.5 XML on the Fly: Nonpersistent XML Data

238

8.6 Chapter Summary

240

Part IV: Querying XML

242

Chapter 9. XPath 1.0 and XPath 2.0

244

9.1 Introduction

244

9.2 XPath 1.0

246

9.3 XPath 2.0 Components

281

9.4 XPath 2.0 and XQuery

287

9.5 Chapter Summary

288

Chapter 10. Introduction to XQuery

290

10.1 Introduction

290

10.2 A Brief History

291

10.3 Requirements

293

10.4 Use Cases

298

10.5 The XQuery 1.0 Suite of Specifications

304

10.6 The Data Model

309

10.7 The XQueryType System

326

10.8 XQuery 1.0 Formal Semantics and Static Typing

335

10.9 Functions and Operators

342

10.10 XQuery 1.0 and XSLT 2.0 Serialization

348

10.11 Chapter Summary

356

Chapter 11. XQuery 1.0 Definition

358

11.1 Introduction

358

11.2 Overview of XQuery

359

11.3 The XQuery Processing Model

362

11.4 The XQuery Grammar

367

11.5 XQuery Expressions

368

11.6 FLWOR Expressions

409

11.7 Error Handling

422

11.8 Modules and Query Prologs

423

11.9 A Longer Example with Data

431

11.10 XQuery for SQL Programmers

431

11.11 Chapter Summary

432

Chapter 12. XQueryX

436

12.1 Introduction

436

12.2 How Far to Go?

437

12.3 The XQueryX Specification

445

12.4 XQueryX By Example

446

12.5 Querying XQueryX

462

12.6 Chapter Summary

466

Chapter 13. What's Missing?

468

13.1 Introduction

468

13.2 Full-Text

469

13.3 Update

507

13.4 Chapter Summary

524

Chapter 14. XQuery APIs

526

14.1 Introduction

526

14.2 Alphabet-Soup Review

527

14.3 XQJ — XQuery for Java

532

14.4 SQL/XML

549

14.5 Looking Ahead

550

Chapter 15. SQL/XML

552

15.1 Introduction

552

15.2 SQL/XML Publishing Functions

555

15.3 XML DataType

566

15.4 XQuery Functions

569

15.5 Managing XML in the Database

601

15.6 Talking the Same Language — Mappings

602

15.7 Chapter Summary

609

Part V: Querying and The World Wide Web

612

Chapter 16 XML-Derived Markup Languages

614

16.1 Introduction

614

16.2 Markup Languages

615

16.3 Discovery on the World Wide Web

626

16.4 Customized Query Languages

631

16.5 Chapter Summary

633

Chapter 17. Internationalization: Putting the "W" in "WWW"

634

17.1 Introduction

634

17.2 What Is Internationalization?

635

17.3 Internationalization and the World Wide Web

636

17.4 Internationalization Implications: XPath, XQuery, and SQL/XML

647

17.5 Chapter Summary

650

Chapter 18. Finding Stuff

652

18.1 Introduction

652

18.2 Finding Structured Data — Databases

653

18.3 Finding Stuff on theWeb — Web Search

654

18.4 Finding Stuff atWork — Enterprise Search

667

18.5 Finding Other People's Stuff — Federated Search

669

18.6 Finding Services — WSDL, UDDI,WSIL, RDDL

670

18.7 Finding Stuff in a More NaturaIWay

673

18.8 Putting It All Together —The Semantic Web+

674

Appendix A. The Example

676

A.1 Introduction

676

A.2 Example Data

677

A.3 Some Examples from the Book

727

A.4 A SimpleWeb Application

758

A.5 Summary

778

Appendix B. Standards Processes

780

B.1 Introduction

780

B.2 World WideWeb Consortium (W3C)

782

B.3 Java Community Process (JCP)

786

B.4 De Jure Standards:ANSI and ISO

790

B.5 Summary

798

Appendix C. Grammars

800

C.1 Introduction

800

C.2 XQuery Grammar

800

C.3 SQL/XML Grammar

808

C.4 Chapter Summary

817

Index

818

About the Authors

844